zinc dust
 
Notes:
a metallic element of atomic number 30 and atomic weight 65.38. it is a necessary trace element in the diet, forming an essential part of many enzymes, and playing an important role in protein synthesis and in cell division. zinc deficiency is associated with anemia, short stature, hypogonadism, impaired wound healing, and geophagia. it is known by the symbol zn. Although zinc is an essential requirement for good health, excess zinc can be harmful. Excessive absorption of zinc suppresses copper and iron absorption. The free zinc ion in solution is highly toxic to plants, invertebrates, and even vertebrate fish. The Free Ion Activity Model is well-established in the literature, and shows that just micromolar amounts of the free ion kills some organisms. A recent example showed 6 micromolar killing 93% of all Daphnia in water.; Binary compounds of zinc are known for most of the metalloids and all the nonmetals except the noble gases. The oxide ZnO is a white powder that is nearly insoluble in neutral aqueous solutions, but is amphoteric, dissolving in both strong basic and acidic solutions. The other chalcogenides (ZnS, ZnSe, and ZnTe) have varied applications in electronics and optics. Pnictogenides (Zn3N2, Zn3P2, Zn3As2 and Zn3Sb2), the peroxide (ZnO2), the hydride (ZnH2), and the carbide (ZnC2) are also known. Of the four halides, ZnF2 has the most ionic character, whereas the others (ZnCl2, ZnBr2, and ZnI2) have relatively low melting points and are considered to have more covalent character.; Brass, which is an alloy of copper and zinc, has been used since at least the 10th century BC. Impure zinc metal was not produced in large scale until the 13th century in India, while the metal was unknown to Europe until the end of the 16th century. Alchemists burned zinc in air to form what they called "philosopher's wool" or "white snow". The element was probably named by the alchemist Paracelsus after the German word Zinke. German chemist Andreas Sigismund Marggraf is normally given credit for discovering pure metallic zinc in 1746. Work by Luigi Galvani and Alessandro Volta uncovered the electrochemical properties of zinc by 1800. Corrosion-resistant zinc plating of steel (hot-dip galvanizing) is the major application for zinc. Other applications are in batteries and alloys, such as brass. A variety of zinc compounds are commonly used, such as zinc carbonate and zinc gluconate (as dietary supplements), zinc chloride (in deodorants), zinc pyrithione (anti-dandruff shampoos), zinc sulfide (in luminescent paints), and zinc methyl or zinc diethyl in the organic laboratory.; Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) is a semiconductive alloy that can be divided into an array of small sensing devices. These devices are similar to an integrated circuit and can detect the energy of incoming gamma ray photons. When placed behind an absorbing mask, the CZT sensor array can also be used to determine the direction of the rays. Zinc is used as the anode or fuel of the zinc-air battery/fuel cell providing the basis of the theorized zinc economy.; Groups at risk for zinc deficiency include the elderly, vegetarians, and those with renal insufficiency. The zinc chelator phytate, found in seeds and cereal bran, can contribute to zinc malabsorption in those with heavily vegetarian diets. There is a paucity of adequate zinc biomarkers, and the most widely used indicator, plasma zinc, has poor sensitivity and specificity. Diagnosing zinc deficiency is a persistent challenge.; In weak basic solutions containing Zn2+ ions, the hydroxide Zn(OH)2 forms as a white precipitate. In stronger alkaline solutions, this hydroxide is dissolved to form zincates ([Zn(OH)4]2?). The nitrate Zn(NO3)2, chlorate Zn(ClO3)2, sulfate ZnSO4, phosphate Zn3(PO4)2, molybdate ZnMoO4, cyanide Zn(CN)2, arsenite Zn(AsO2)2, arsenate Zn(AsO4)2?8H2O and the chromate ZnCrO4 (one of the few colored zinc compounds) are a few examples of other common inorganic compounds of zinc. One of the simplest examples of an organic compound of zinc is the acetate (Zn(O2CCH3)2).; Organozinc compounds are those that contain zinc?carbon covalent bonds. Diethylzinc ((C2H5)2Zn) is a reagent in synthetic chemistry. It was first reported in 1848 from the reaction of zinc and ethyl iodide, and was the first compound known to contain a metal?carbon sigma bond. Decamethyldizincocene contains a strong zinc?zinc bond at room temperature.; Other sources include fortified food and dietary supplements, which come in various forms. A 1998 review concluded that zinc oxide, one of the most common supplements in the United States, and zinc carbonate are nearly insoluble and poorly absorbed in the body. This review cited studies which found low plasma zinc concentrations after zinc oxide and zinc carbonate were consumed compared with those seen after consumption of zinc acetate and sulfate salts. However, harmful excessive supplementation is a problem among the relatively affluent, and should probably not exceed 20 mg/day in healthy people, although the U.S. National Research Council set a Tolerable Upper Intake of 40 mg/day.; Roughly one quarter of all zinc output, in the United States (2006), is consumed in the form of zinc compounds; a variety of which are used industrially. Zinc oxide is widely used as a white pigment in paints, and as a catalyst in the manufacture of rubber. It is also used as a heat disperser for the rubber and acts to protect its polymers from ultraviolet radiation (the same UV protection is conferred to plastics containing zinc oxide). The semiconductor properties of zinc oxide make it useful in varistors and photocopying products. The zinc zinc-oxide cycle is a two step thermochemical process based on zinc and zinc oxide for hydrogen production.; The Age-Related Eye Disease Study determined that zinc can be part of an effective treatment for age-related macular degeneration. Zinc supplementation is an effective treatment for acrodermatitis enteropathica, a genetic disorder affecting zinc absorption that was previously fatal to babies born with it.; The element is normally found in association with other base metals such as copper and lead in ores. Zinc is a chalcophile ("sulfur loving"), meaning the element has a low affinity for oxygen and prefers to bond with sulfur in highly insoluble sulfides. Chalcophiles formed as the crust solidified under the reducing conditions of the early Earth's atmosphere. Sphalerite, which is a form of zinc sulfide, is the most heavily mined zinc-containing ore because its concentrate contains 60?62% zinc.; The free zinc ion is a powerful Lewis acid up to the point of being corrosive. Stomach acid contains hydrochloric acid, in which metallic zinc dissolves readily to give corrosive zinc chloride. Swallowing a post-1982 American one cent piece (97.5% zinc) can cause damage to the stomach lining due to the high solubility of the zinc ion in the acidic stomach.; The metal is hard and brittle at most temperatures but becomes malleable between 100 and 150 C. Above 210 C, the metal becomes brittle again and can be pulverized by beating. Zinc is a fair conductor of electricity. For a metal, zinc has relatively low melting (420 C) and boiling points (900 C). Its melting point is the lowest of all the transition metals aside from mercury and cadmium.; The most common decay mode of an isotope of zinc with a mass number lower than 64 is electron capture. The decay product resulting from electron capture is an isotope of copper.; There are 2?4 grams of zinc distributed throughout the human body. Most zinc is in the brain, muscle, bones, kidney, and liver, with the highest concentrations in the prostate and parts of the eye. Semen is particularly rich in zinc, which is a key factor in prostate gland function and reproductive organ growth.; Various isolated examples of the use of impure zinc in ancient times have been discovered. A possibly prehistoric statuette containing 87.5% zinc was found in a Dacian archaeological site in Transylvania (modern Romania). Ornaments made of alloys that contain 80?90% zinc with lead, iron, antimony, and other metals making up the remainder, have been found that are 2500 years old. The Berne zinc tablet is a votive plaque dating to Roman Gaul made of an alloy that is mostly zinc. Also, some ancient writings appear to mention zinc. The Greek historian Strabo, in a passage taken from an earlier writer of the 4th century BC, mentions "drops of false silver", which when mixed with copper make brass. This may refer to small quantities of zinc produced as a by-product of smelting sulfide ores. The Charaka Samhita, thought to have been written in 500 BC or before, mentions a metal which, when oxidized, produces pushpanjan, thought to be zinc oxide.; Zinc (pronounced /?z??k/ zingk, from German: Zink), also known as spelter, is a metallic chemical element; it has the symbol Zn and atomic number 30. It is the first element in group 12 of the periodic table. Zinc is, in some respects, chemically similar to magnesium, because its ion is of similar size and its only common oxidation state is +2. Zinc is the 24th most abundant element in the Earth's crust and has five stable isotopes. The most exploited zinc ore is sphalerite, a zinc sulfide. The largest exploitable deposits are found in Australia, Canada, and the United States. Zinc production includes froth flotation of the ore, roasting, and final extraction using electricity (electrowinning).; Zinc chemistry is similar to the chemistry of the late first-row transition metals, nickel and copper though it has a filled d-shell, so its compounds are diamagnetic and mostly colorless. The ionic radii of zinc and magnesium happen to be nearly identical. Because of this some of their salts have the same crystal structure and in circumstances where ionic radius is a determining factor zinc and magnesium chemistries have much in common. Otherwise there is little similarity. Zinc tends to form bonds with a greater degree of covalency and it forms much more stable complexes with N- and S- donors. Complexes of zinc are mostly 4- or 6- coordinate although 5-coordinate complexes are known.; Zinc chloride is often added to lumber as a fire retardant and can be used as a wood preservative. It is also used to make other chemicals. Zinc methyl (Zn(CH3)2) is used in a number of organic syntheses. Zinc sulfide (ZnS) is used in luminescent pigments such as on the hands of clocks, X-ray and television screens, and luminous paints. Crystals of ZnS are used in lasers that operate in the mid-infrared part of the spectrum. Zinc sulphate is a chemical in dyes and pigments. Zinc pyrithione is used in antifouling paints.; Zinc has an electron configuration of [Ar]3d104s2 and is a member of the group 12 of the periodic table. It is a moderately reactive metal and strong reducing agent. The surface of the pure metal tarnishes quickly, eventually forming a protective passivating layer of the basic zinc carbonate, Zn5(OH)6CO3, by reaction with atmospheric carbon dioxide. This layer helps prevent further reaction with air and water.; Zinc is a good Lewis acid, making it a useful catalytic agent in hydroxylation and other enzymatic reactions. The metal also has a flexible coordination geometry, which allows proteins using it to rapidly shift conformations to perform biological reactions. Two examples of zinc-containing enzymes are carbonic anhydrase and carboxypeptidase, which are vital to the processes of carbon dioxide (CO2) regulation and digestion of proteins, respectively.; Zinc is an essential element, necessary for sustaining all life.Physiologically, it exists as an ion in the body. It is estimated that 3000 of the hundreds of thousands of proteins in the human body contain zinc prosthetic groups. In addition, there are over a dozen types of cells in the human body that secrete zinc ions, and the roles of these secreted zinc signals in medicine and health are now being actively studied. Intriguingly, brain cells in the mammalian forebrain are one type of cell that secretes zinc, along with its other neuronal messenger substances. Cells in the salivary gland, prostate, immune system and intestine are other types that secrete zinc. Obtaining a sufficient zinc intake during pregnancy and in young children is a problem, especially among those who cannot afford a good and varied diet. Brain development is stunted by zinc deficiency in utero and in youth. Zinc is an activator of certain enzymes, such as carbonic anhydrase. Carbonic anhydrase is important in the transport of carbon dioxide in vertebrate blood. Even though zinc is an essential requirement for a healthy body, too much zinc can be harmful. Excessive absorption of zinc can also suppress copper and iron absorption. The free zinc ion in solution is highly toxic to plants, invertebrates, and even vertebrate fish. The Free Ion Activity Model (FIAM) is well-established in the literature, and shows that just micromolar amounts of the free ion kills some organisms.; Zinc is an essential mineral of "exceptional biologic and public health importance". Zinc deficiency affects about two billion people in the developing world and is associated with many diseases. In children it causes growth retardation, delayed sexual maturation, infection susceptibility, and diarrhea, contributing to the death of about 800,000 children worldwide per year. Enzymes with a zinc atom in the reactive center are widespread in biochemistry, such as alcohol dehydrogenase in humans. Consumption of excess zinc can cause ataxia, lethargy and copper deficiency.; Zinc is an essential trace element, necessary for plants, animals, and microorganisms. Zinc is found in nearly 100 specific enzymes (other sources say 300), serves as structural ions in transcription factors and is stored and transferred in metallothioneins. It is "typically the second most abundant transition metal in organisms" after iron and it is the only metal which appears in all enzyme classes.; Zinc powder is sometimes used as a propellant in model rockets. When a compressed mixture of 70% zinc and 30% sulfur powder is ignited there is a violent chemical reaction. This produces zinc sulfide, together with large amounts of hot gas, heat, and light. Zinc sheet metal is used to make zinc bars.; Zinc, also referred to in nonscientific contexts as spelter, is a bluish-white, lustrous, diamagnetic metal, though most common commercial grades of the metal have a dull finish. It is somewhat less dense than iron and has a hexagonal crystal structure.
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zinc (Click)
CAS Number: 7440-66-6Picture of molecule
Other: 12793-53-2
ECHA EINECS - REACH Pre-Reg: 231-175-3
FDA UNII: J41CSQ7QDS
Nikkaji Web: J3.735D
Molecular Weight: 65.38000000
Formula: Zn
NMR Predictor: Predict (works with chrome or firefox)
Category: antioxidants
 
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Physical Properties:
Appearance: dark bluish gray fine powder (est)
Assay: 95.00 to 100.00 % 
Food Chemicals Codex Listed: No
Melting Point: 419.53 °C. @ 760.00 mm Hg
Boiling Point: 907.00 °C. @ 760.00 mm Hg
Flash Point: 32.00 °F. TCC ( 0.00 °C. ) (est)
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Organoleptic Properties:
Odor Strength: none
Odor Description:
at 100.00 %. 
odorless
  
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Cosmetic Information:
CosIng: cosmetic data
Cosmetic Uses: antioxidants
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Suppliers:
American Elements
Zinc Dust 99%
Odor: characteristic
Use: American Elements specializes in producing high purity Zinc Dust with the smallest possible average grain sizes for use in preparation of pressed and bonded sputtering targets and in Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) and Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) processes including Thermal and Electron Beam (E-Beam) Evaporation, Low Temperature Organic Evaporation, Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), Metallic-Organic and Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD). Powders are also useful in any application where high surface areas are desired such as water treatment and in fuel cell and solar applications. Nanoparticles (See also Nanotechnology Information and Quantum Dots) also produce very high surface areas. Our standard Dust particle sizes average in the range of - 325 mesh, - 100 mesh, 10-50 microns and submicron (< 1 micron). We can also provide many materials in the nanoscale range. American Elements produces to many standard grades when applicable, including Mil Spec (military grade); ACS, Reagent and Technical Grade; Food, Agricultural and Pharmaceutical Grade; Optical Grade, USP and EP/BP (European Pharmacopoeia/British Pharmacopoeia) and follows applicable ASTM testing standards.
Kraft Chemical
Zinc Dust
Kraft Chemical
Zinc
Penta International
ZINC DUST
Sigma-Aldrich: Aldrich
For experimental / research use only.
Zinc Dust purum, ≥99%, powder
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Safety Information:
Preferred SDS: View
 
Hazards identification
 
Classification of the substance or mixture
GHS Classification in accordance with 29 CFR 1910 (OSHA HCS)
None found.
GHS Label elements, including precautionary statements
 
Pictogram
 
Hazard statement(s)
None found.
Precautionary statement(s)
None found.
Oral/Parenteral Toxicity:
oral-duck LDLo  388 mg/kg
BEHAVIORAL: ATAXIA AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM: OTHER (DIRECT) PARASYMPATHOMIMETIC BLOOD: CHANGES IN LEUCOCYTE (WBC) COUNT
Journal of Wildlife Diseases. Vol. 36, Pg. 111, 2000.

Dermal Toxicity:
Not determined
Inhalation Toxicity:
inhalation-human TCLo 124 mg/m3/50M
LUNGS, THORAX, OR RESPIRATION: DYSPNEA LUNGS, THORAX, OR RESPIRATION: COUGH SKIN AND APPENDAGES (SKIN): SWEATING: OTHER
Archiv fuer Hygiene. Vol. 72, Pg. 358, 1910.

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Safety in Use Information:
Category: antioxidants
Recommendation for zinc dust usage levels up to:
 not for fragrance use.
 
Recommendation for zinc dust flavor usage levels up to:
 not for flavor use.
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Safety References:
European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) reference(s):
Scientific Opinion on the potential reduction of the currently authorised maximum zinc content in complete feed
View page or View pdf
Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to zinc and normal function of the immune system pursuant to Article 14 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006
View page or View pdf
Outcome of a public consultation on the Draft Scientific Opinion of the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) on Dietary Reference Values for zinc
View page or View pdf
Scientific Opinion on Dietary Reference Values for zinc
View page or View pdf
Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to zinc and normal growth pursuant to Article 14 of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006
View page or View pdf
Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of zinc chelate of L-lysinate-HCl as feed additive for all animal species
View page or View pdf
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EPA Substance Registry Services (TSCA): 7440-66-6
EPA ACToR: Toxicology Data
EPA Substance Registry Services (SRS): Registry
Laboratory Chemical Safety Summary : 23994
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: Data
 zinc
Chemidplus: 0007440666
EPA/NOAA CAMEO: hazardous materials
RTECS: 7440-66-6
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References:
 zinc
NIST Chemistry WebBook: Search Inchi
Canada Domestic Sub. List: 7440-66-6
Pubchem (cid): 23994
Pubchem (sid): 134988678
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Other Information:
(IUPAC): Atomic Weights of the Elements 2009
(IUPAC): Atomic Weights of the Elements 2009 (pdf)
Videos: The Periodic Table of Videos
tgsc: Atomic Weights use for this web site
(IUPAC): Periodic Table of the Elements
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Potential Blenders and core components note
 
None Found
 
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Potential Uses:
None Found
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Occurrence (nature, food, other): note
 allspice fruit
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 carrot root
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 cassava root
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 cassia bark
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 cayenne fruit
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 celery leaf
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 celery root
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 celery seed
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 chamomile garden chamomile flower
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 chayote leaf
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 cherimoya fruit
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 cherry sour cherry fruit
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 chestnut sweet chestnut nut
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 chicory root
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 cinnamon ceylon cinnamon bark
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 cinnamon ceylon cinnamon leaf
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 cloudberry fruit
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 coconut seed
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 coriander fruit
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 coriander seed
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 corn seed
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 cornmint plant
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 cranberry fruit
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 cucumber fruit
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 cumin seed
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 currant black currant fruit
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 currant red currant fruit
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 dandelion leaf
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 dandelion root
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 date palm fruit
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 date palm seed
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 dill plant
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 dill seed
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 eggplant fruit
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 elder black elder fruit
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 endive leaf
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 evening-primrose seed
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 fennel seed
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 fig fruit
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 flax seed
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 gooseberry fruit
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 goosefoot seed
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 gourd calabash gourd fruit
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 leek wild leek plant
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 lime fruit
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 loquat leaf
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 lotus indian lotus seed
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 lupine white lupine seed
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 macadamia nut
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 mandarin fruit
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 mango fruit
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 marjoram plant
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 mugwort plant
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 mustard field mustard seed
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 mustard greens leaf
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 nutmeg aril
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 oat plant
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 pea black-eyed pea seed
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 peach bark
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 peppermint leaf
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 persimmon american persimmon leaf
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 persimmon american persimmon stem
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 pigweed leaf
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 pine pinyon pine seed
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 pineapple fruit
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 plum fruit
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 poppy opium poppy seed
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 potato sweet potato root
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 potato tuber
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 pumpkin leaf
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 purslane shoot
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 radish root
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 radish seed
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 raspberry red raspberry fruit
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 raspberry red raspberry leaf
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 rhubarb plant
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 roselle flower
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 rosemary leaf
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 rye seed
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 safflower flower
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 sage leaf
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 sesame seed
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 sorrel garden sorrel leaf
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 soursop fruit
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 soybean seed
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 spearmint leaf
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 spinach plant
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 spinach water spinach leaf
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 spirulina plant
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 squash summer squash fruit
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 star fruit fruit
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 sunflower seed
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 taro leaf
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 taro root
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 tarragon plant
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 tea leaf
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 thyme leaf
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 thyme plant
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 tomatillo fruit
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 tomato fruit
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 turmeric plant
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 turmeric rhizome
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 walnut black walnut fruit
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 walnut black walnut nut
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 walnut black walnut pericarp
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 walnut english walnut nut
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 watercress plant
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 watermelon fruit
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 wheat seed
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 yam wild yam root
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Synonyms   Articles   Notes   Search   Top
Synonyms:
 asarco L 15
 jasad
 merrillite
 rheinzink
 zinc
 zinc powder
 zincide
 zincum
 zincum metallicum
 zincum metallicum
Synonyms   Articles   Notes   Search   Top
Synonyms   Articles   Notes   Search   Top
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