EU/US Properties Organoleptics Cosmetics Suppliers Safety Safety in use Safety references References Other Blenders Uses Occurrence Synonyms Articles Notes
 

polyethylene glycol
alpha-hydro-omega-hydroxypoly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl)

Supplier Sponsors

CAS Number: 25322-68-3Picture of molecule3D/inchi
Other:101677-86-5
ECHA ELINCS - REACH Pre-Reg:500-038-2
FDA UNII:16P9295IIL
MDL:MFCD00081839
Formula:(C2 H4 O)mult-H2 O
Category:multipurpose additives
 
US / EU / FDA / JECFA / FEMA / FLAVIS / Scholar / Patent Information:
Google Scholar:Search
Google Books:Search
Google Scholar: with word "volatile"Search
Google Scholar: with word "flavor"Search
Google Scholar: with word "odor"Search
Perfumer and Flavorist:Search
Google Patents:Search
US Patents:Search
EU Patents:Search
PubMed:Search
NCBI:Search
 FDA/DG SANTE Petitions, Reviews, Notices:
FCN 107 Polyethylene glycol View - notice
FCN 671 Poly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl), a-hydro-?-hydroxy- View - notice
JECFA Food Additive: Polyethylene Glycols
GSFA Codex: Polyethylene Glycol (1521
DG SANTE Food Additives:polyethylene glycol
DG SANTE Food Contact Materials:polyethylene glycol
FDA Mainterm (SATF):25322-68-3 ; POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL (M W 200-9,500)
FDA Regulation:
FDA PART 172 -- FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION
Subpart C--Coatings, Films and Related Substances
Sec. 172.210 Coatings on fresh citrus fruit.


FDA PART 172 -- FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION
Subpart I--Multipurpose Additives
Sec. 172.820 Polyethylene glycol (mean molecular weight 200-9,500).


FDA PART 173 -- SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION
Subpart D--Specific Usage Additives
Sec. 173.310 Boiler water additives.


FDA PART 173 -- SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION
Subpart D--Specific Usage Additives
Sec. 173.340 Defoaming agents.


FDA PART 175 -- INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: ADHESIVES AND COMPONENTS OF COATINGS
Subpart B--Substances for Use Only as Components of Adhesives
Sec. 175.105 Adhesives.


FDA PART 175 -- INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: ADHESIVES AND COMPONENTS OF COATINGS
Subpart C--Substances for Use as Components of Coatings
Sec. 175.300 Resinous and polymeric coatings.


FDA PART 176 -- INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: PAPER AND PAPERBOARD COMPONENTS
Subpart B--Substances for Use Only as Components of Paper and Paperboard
Sec. 176.180 Components of paper and paperboard in contact with dry food.


FDA PART 178 -- INDIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES: ADJUVANTS, PRODUCTION AIDS, AND SANITIZERS
Subpart D--Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids
Sec. 178.3750 Polyethylene glycol (mean molecular weight 200-9,500).


FDA PART 73 -- LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION
Subpart A--Foods
Sec. 73.1 Diluents in color additive mixtures for food use exempt from certification.
 
Physical Properties:
Appearance:colorless to white clear viscous liquid to waxy solid (est)
Food Chemicals Codex Listed: No
Boiling Point: 211.00 to 212.00 °C. @ 760.00 mm Hg (est)
Vapor Pressure:0.042000 mmHg @ 25.00 °C. (est)
Flash Point: 227.00 °F. TCC ( 108.20 °C. ) (est)
logP (o/w): -1.362 (est)
Soluble in:
 water, 1e+006 mg/L @ 25 °C (est)
 
Organoleptic Properties:
Odor and/or flavor descriptions from others (if found).
 
Cosmetic Information:
None found
 
Suppliers:
BOC Sciences
For experimental / research use only.
Poly(ethylene glycol) 99%
Covalent Chemical
Polyethylene Glycol
Kowa Amerian Corporation
Alkox E40
Odor: characteristic
Use: Alkox E 40 is a water-soluble polymer providing binding, thickening, lubricity, water retention, and film formation benefits to deliver excellent performance in a variety of applications.
Penta International
POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL 1000 NF
Penta International
POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL 200
Penta International
POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL 300 NF
Penta International
POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL 400 NF
Penta International
POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL 600 USP/NF/FCC
Penta International
POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL 8000 FLAKES NF
Sigma-Aldrich: Aldrich
For experimental / research use only.
Poly(ethylene glycol) average Mn 400
 
Safety Information:
Preferred SDS: View
 
Hazards identification
 
Classification of the substance or mixture
GHS Classification in accordance with 29 CFR 1910 (OSHA HCS)
None found.
GHS Label elements, including precautionary statements
 
Pictogram
 
Hazard statement(s)
None found.
Precautionary statement(s)
None found.
Oral/Parenteral Toxicity:
oral-rat LD50 51310 mg/kg
KIDNEY, URETER, AND BLADDER: OTHER CHANGES
Arzneimittel-Forschung. Drug Research. Vol. 3, Pg. 451, 1953.

oral-rat LD50 51200 mg/kg
KIDNEY, URETER, AND BLADDER: OTHER CHANGES
Arzneimittel-Forschung. Drug Research. Vol. 3, Pg. 451, 1953.

oral-rat LD50 50000 mg/kg
KIDNEY, URETER, AND BLADDER: OTHER CHANGES
Arzneimittel-Forschung. Drug Research. Vol. 3, Pg. 451, 1953.

oral-rat LD50 > 5000 mg/kg
Dow Chemical Company Reports. Vol. MSD-940

oral-rat LD50 50000 mg/kg
"Toxicology of Drugs and Chemicals," Deichmann, W.B., New York, Academic Press, Inc., 1969Vol. -, Pg. 747, 1969.

oral-rat LD50 > 5000 mg/kg
Dow Chemical Company Reports. Vol. MSD-935

oral-rat LD50 50000 mg/kg
"Toxicology of Drugs and Chemicals," Deichmann, W.B., New York, Academic Press, Inc., 1969Vol. -, Pg. 747, 1969.

oral-rat LD50 45000 mg/kg
"Patty's Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology," 3rd rev. ed., Clayton, G.D., and F.E. Clayton, eds., New York, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1978-82. Vol. 3 originally pub. in 1979; pub. as 2n rev. ed. in 1985.Vol. 2C, Pg. 3847, 1982.

oral-rat LD50 44200 mg/kg
KIDNEY, URETER, AND BLADDER: OTHER CHANGES
Arzneimittel-Forschung. Drug Research. Vol. 3, Pg. 451, 1953.

oral-rat LD50 32000 mg/kg
Dow Chemical Company Reports. Vol. MSD-937

oral-rat LD50 31640 mg/kg
KIDNEY, URETER, AND BLADDER: OTHER CHANGES
Arzneimittel-Forschung. Drug Research. Vol. 3, Pg. 451, 1953.

oral-rat LD50 31600 mg/kg
"Toxicology of Drugs and Chemicals," Deichmann, W.B., New York, Academic Press, Inc., 1969Vol. -, Pg. 747, 1969.

oral-rat LD50 30200 mg/kg
Journal of the American Pharmaceutical Association, Scientific Edition. Vol. 39, Pg. 349, 1950.

oral-rat LD50 30000 mg/kg
Dow Chemical Company Reports. Vol. MSD-2203

oral-rat LD50 28000 mg/kg
Dow Chemical Company Reports. Vol. MSD-1112

oral-rat LD50 27500 mg/kg
KIDNEY, URETER, AND BLADDER: OTHER CHANGES
Arzneimittel-Forschung. Drug Research. Vol. 3, Pg. 451, 1953.

oral-rat LD50 22000 mg/kg
"Toxicology of Drugs and Chemicals," Deichmann, W.B., New York, Academic Press, Inc., 1969Vol. -, Pg. 747, 1969.

oral-rat LD50 > 4000 mg/kg
Dow Chemical Company Reports. Vol. MSD-938

oral-rat LD50 1054 mg/kg
Dow Chemical Company Reports. Vol. MSD-95

oral-rat LD50 600 mg/kg
Dow Chemical Company Reports. Vol. MSD-94

intravenous-rat LD50 13000 mg/kg
KIDNEY, URETER, AND BLADDER: OTHER CHANGES
Arzneimittel-Forschung. Drug Research. Vol. 3, Pg. 451, 1953.

intravenous-rat LD50 7500 mg/kg
"Patty's Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology," 3rd rev. ed., Clayton, G.D., and F.E. Clayton, eds., New York, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1978-82. Vol. 3 originally pub. in 1979; pub. as 2n rev. ed. in 1985.Vol. 2C, Pg. 3849, 1982.

intravenous-rat LD50 7312 mg/kg
Arzneimittel-Forschung. Drug Research. Vol. 26, Pg. 1581, 1976.

intravenous-rat LD50 7130 mg/kg
"Patty's Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology," 3rd rev. ed., Clayton, G.D., and F.E. Clayton, eds., New York, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1978-82. Vol. 3 originally pub. in 1979; pub. as 2n rev. ed. in 1985.Vol. 2C, Pg. 3849, 1982.

intraperitoneal-rat LD50 17700 mg/kg
KIDNEY, URETER, AND BLADDER: OTHER CHANGES
Arzneimittel-Forschung. Drug Research. Vol. 3, Pg. 451, 1953.

intraperitoneal-rat LD50 17000 mg/kg
Journal of the American Pharmaceutical Association, Scientific Edition. Vol. 39, Pg. 349, 1950.

intraperitoneal-rat LD50 16000 mg/kg
KIDNEY, URETER, AND BLADDER: OTHER CHANGES
Arzneimittel-Forschung. Drug Research. Vol. 3, Pg. 451, 1953.

intraperitoneal-rat LD50 15570 mg/kg
KIDNEY, URETER, AND BLADDER: OTHER CHANGES
Arzneimittel-Forschung. Drug Research. Vol. 3, Pg. 451, 1953.

intraperitoneal-rat LD50 15390 mg/kg
KIDNEY, URETER, AND BLADDER: OTHER CHANGES
Arzneimittel-Forschung. Drug Research. Vol. 3, Pg. 451, 1953.

intraperitoneal-rat LD50 14100 mg/kg
"Patty's Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology," 3rd rev. ed., Clayton, G.D., and F.E. Clayton, eds., New York, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1978-82. Vol. 3 originally pub. in 1979; pub. as 2n rev. ed. in 1985.Vol. 2C, Pg. 3849, 1982.

intraperitoneal-rat LD50 12600 mg/kg
KIDNEY, URETER, AND BLADDER: OTHER CHANGES
Arzneimittel-Forschung. Drug Research. Vol. 3, Pg. 451, 1953.

intraperitoneal-rat LD50 9708 mg/kg
Proceedings of the European Society of Toxicology. Vol. 17, Pg. 351, 1976.

intraperitoneal-rat LD50 9700 mg/kg
"Patty's Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology," 3rd rev. ed., Clayton, G.D., and F.E. Clayton, eds., New York, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1978-82. Vol. 3 originally pub. in 1979; pub. as 2n rev. ed. in 1985.Vol. 2C, Pg. 3849, 1982.

intraperitoneal-rat LD50 9000 mg/kg
KIDNEY, URETER, AND BLADDER: OTHER CHANGES
Arzneimittel-Forschung. Drug Research. Vol. 3, Pg. 451, 1953.

intraperitoneal-rat LD50 6790 mg/kg
KIDNEY, URETER, AND BLADDER: OTHER CHANGES
Arzneimittel-Forschung. Drug Research. Vol. 3, Pg. 451, 1953.

oral-rabbit LD50 76000 mg/kg
KIDNEY, URETER, AND BLADDER: OTHER CHANGES
Arzneimittel-Forschung. Drug Research. Vol. 3, Pg. 451, 1953.

oral-rabbit LD50 28900 mg/kg
KIDNEY, URETER, AND BLADDER: OTHER CHANGES
Arzneimittel-Forschung. Drug Research. Vol. 3, Pg. 451, 1953.

oral-rabbit LD50 26800 mg/kg
KIDNEY, URETER, AND BLADDER: OTHER CHANGES
Arzneimittel-Forschung. Drug Research. Vol. 3, Pg. 451, 1953.

oral-rabbit LD50 19000 mg/kg
"Patty's Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology," 3rd rev. ed., Clayton, G.D., and F.E. Clayton, eds., New York, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1978-82. Vol. 3 originally pub. in 1979; pub. as 2n rev. ed. in 1985.Vol. 2C, Pg. 3847, 1982.

oral-rabbit LD50 17300 mg/kg
KIDNEY, URETER, AND BLADDER: OTHER CHANGES
Arzneimittel-Forschung. Drug Research. Vol. 3, Pg. 451, 1953.

oral-rabbit LD50 14000 mg/kg
"Patty's Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology," 3rd rev. ed., Clayton, G.D., and F.E. Clayton, eds., New York, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1978-82. Vol. 3 originally pub. in 1979; pub. as 2n rev. ed. in 1985.Vol. 2C, Pg. 3847, 1982.

intravenous-rabbit LD50 8000 mg/kg
BLOOD: CHANGE IN CLOTTING FACTORS
Kriobiologiya i Kriomeditsina. Cryobiology and Cryomedicine. Vol. 4, Pg. 71, 1978.

oral-mouse LD50 36000 mg/kg
"Patty's Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology," 3rd rev. ed., Clayton, G.D., and F.E. Clayton, eds., New York, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1978-82. Vol. 3 originally pub. in 1979; pub. as 2n rev. ed. in 1985.Vol. 2C, Pg. 3847, 1982.

oral-mouse LD50 34000 mg/kg
"Patty's Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology," 3rd rev. ed., Clayton, G.D., and F.E. Clayton, eds., New York, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1978-82. Vol. 3 originally pub. in 1979; pub. as 2n rev. ed. in 1985.Vol. 2C, Pg. 3847, 1982.

oral-mouse LD50 31000 mg/kg
"Patty's Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology," 3rd rev. ed., Clayton, G.D., and F.E. Clayton, eds., New York, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1978-82. Vol. 3 originally pub. in 1979; pub. as 2n rev. ed. in 1985.Vol. 2C, Pg. 3847, 1982.

oral-mouse LD50 28915 mg/kg
Proceedings of the European Society of Toxicology. Vol. 17, Pg. 351, 1976.

intravenous-mouse LD50 16000 mg/kg
KIDNEY, URETER, AND BLADDER: OTHER CHANGES
Arzneimittel-Forschung. Drug Research. Vol. 3, Pg. 451, 1953.

intravenous-mouse LD50 8550 mg/kg
Arzneimittel-Forschung. Drug Research. Vol. 26, Pg. 1581, 1976.

intravenous-mouse LD50 7.90 mg/kg
Research Progress in Organic-Biological and Medicinal Chemistry. Vol. 2, Pg. 316, 1970.

intraperitoneal-mouse LD50 8000 mg/kg
LUNGS, THORAX, OR RESPIRATION: RESPIRATORY DEPRESSION
Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics. Vol. 103, Pg. 293, 1951.

intraperitoneal-mouse LD50 7500 mg/kg
National Technical Information Service. Vol. AD628-313

intraperitoneal-mouse LD50 2000 mg/kg
LUNGS, THORAX, OR RESPIRATION: RESPIRATORY DEPRESSION
Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics. Vol. 103, Pg. 293, 1951.

intraperitoneal-mouse LD50 473 mg/kg
Yaoxue Tongbao. Bulletin of Pharmacology. Vol. 21, Pg. 387, 1986.

oral-guinea pig LD50 50900 mg/kg
KIDNEY, URETER, AND BLADDER: OTHER CHANGES
Arzneimittel-Forschung. Drug Research. Vol. 3, Pg. 451, 1953.

oral-guinea pig LD50 50000 mg/kg
KIDNEY, URETER, AND BLADDER: OTHER CHANGES
Arzneimittel-Forschung. Drug Research. Vol. 3, Pg. 451, 1953.

oral-guinea pig LD50 28900 mg/kg
KIDNEY, URETER, AND BLADDER: OTHER CHANGES
Arzneimittel-Forschung. Drug Research. Vol. 3, Pg. 451, 1953.

oral-guinea pig LD50 28000 mg/kg
"Patty's Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology," 3rd rev. ed., Clayton, G.D., and F.E. Clayton, eds., New York, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1978-82. Vol. 3 originally pub. in 1979; pub. as 2n rev. ed. in 1985.Vol. 2C, Pg. 3847, 1982.

oral-guinea pig LD50 22500 mg/kg
Journal of the American Pharmaceutical Association, Scientific Edition. Vol. 39, Pg. 349, 1950.

oral-guinea pig LD50 19600 mg/kg
KIDNEY, URETER, AND BLADDER: OTHER CHANGES
Arzneimittel-Forschung. Drug Research. Vol. 3, Pg. 451, 1953.

oral-guinea pig LD50 17000 mg/kg
"Patty's Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology," 3rd rev. ed., Clayton, G.D., and F.E. Clayton, eds., New York, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1978-82. Vol. 3 originally pub. in 1979; pub. as 2n rev. ed. in 1985.Vol. 2C, Pg. 3847, 1982.

oral-guinea pig LD50 15700 mg/kg
KIDNEY, URETER, AND BLADDER: OTHER CHANGES
Arzneimittel-Forschung. Drug Research. Vol. 3, Pg. 451, 1953.

intravenous-dog LDLo 3000 mg/kg
Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics. Vol. 103, Pg. 293, 1951.

intravenous-mouse LD50 7900 ug/kg
Research Progress in Organic-Biological and Medicinal Chemistry. Vol. 2, Pg. 316, 1970.

oral-rabbit LD50 17300 mg/kg
International Journal of Toxicology. Vol. 18(Suppl

oral-rabbit LD50 76000 mg/kg
International Journal of Toxicology. Vol. 18(Suppl

oral-rat LD > 4000 mg/kg
Union Carbide Data Sheet. Vol. 9/25/1969

oral-rat LD50 > 50000 mg/kg
Dow Chemical Company Reports. Vol. MSD-935

oral-rat LD50 > 50000 mg/kg
Dow Chemical Company Reports. Vol. MSD-940

unreported-rat LD50 7800 mg/kg
United States Patent Document. Vol. #4767763

intravenous-rat LDLo 3 mg/kg
Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology. Vol. 16, Pg. 442, 1970.

intravenous-rat LDLo 22000 mg/kg
KIDNEY, URETER, AND BLADDER: HEMATURIA VASCULAR: BP LOWERING NOT CHARACTERIZED IN AUTONOMIC SECTION CARDIAC: ARRHYTHMIAS (INCLUDING CHANGES IN CONDUCTION)
Arzneimittel-Forschung. Drug Research. Vol. 23, Pg. 1087, 1973.

Dermal Toxicity:
skin-rabbit LD50 > 20000 mg/kg
Dow Chemical Company Reports. Vol. MSD-940

subcutaneous-rat LD50 16000 mg/kg
KIDNEY, URETER, AND BLADDER: OTHER CHANGES
Arzneimittel-Forschung. Drug Research. Vol. 3, Pg. 451, 1953.

skin-rabbit LD50 > 20000 mg/kg
Dow Chemical Company Reports. Vol. MSD-935

skin-rabbit LD50 > 20000 mg/kg
Dow Chemical Company Reports. Vol. MSD-939

skin-rabbit LD50 > 20000 mg/kg
Dow Chemical Company Reports. Vol. MSD-937

skin-rabbit LD50 > 20000 mg/kg
Dow Chemical Company Reports. Vol. MSD-2203

skin-rabbit LD50 > 20000 mg/kg
Dow Chemical Company Reports. Vol. MSD-96

skin-rabbit LD50 > 20000 mg/kg
Dow Chemical Company Reports. Vol. MSD-2202

skin-rabbit LD50 > 20000 mg/kg
Dow Chemical Company Reports. Vol. MSD-1112

skin-rabbit LD50 > 20 ml/kg
International Journal of Toxicology. Vol. 18(Suppl

subcutaneous-mouse LD50 18000 mg/kg
KIDNEY, URETER, AND BLADDER: OTHER CHANGES
Arzneimittel-Forschung. Drug Research. Vol. 3, Pg. 451, 1953.

skin-rabbit LD > 1000 mg/kg
Union Carbide Data Sheet. Vol. 9/25/1969

Inhalation Toxicity:
Not determined
 
Safety in Use Information:
Category: multipurpose additives
Recommendation for polyethylene glycol usage levels up to:
 not for fragrance use.
 
Recommendation for polyethylene glycol flavor usage levels up to:
 not for flavor use.
 
Safety References:
European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) reference(s):

Opinion of the Scientific Panel on food additives, flavourings, processing aids and materials in contact with food (AFC) related to an application on the use of polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a film coating agent for use in food supplement products
View page or View pdf

Scientific Opinion on the safety evaluation of the active substances, iron, polyethyleneglycol, disodium pyrophosphate, monosodium phosphate and sodium chloride for use in food contact materials
View page or View pdf

Refined exposure assessment of polyethylene glycol (E 1521) from its use as a food additive
View page or View pdf

EPI System: View
ClinicalTrials.gov:search
Daily Med:search
NIOSH International Chemical Safety Cards:search
NLM Hazardous Substances Data Bank:Search
Chemical Carcinogenesis Research Information System:Search
AIDS Citations:Search
Cancer Citations:Search
Toxicology Citations:Search
EPA GENetic TOXicology:Search
Env. Mutagen Info. Center:Search
NLM Developmental and Reproductive Toxicity:Search
EPA Substance Registry Services (TSCA):25322-68-3
EPA ACToR:Toxicology Data
EPA Substance Registry Services (SRS):Registry
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases:Data
WGK Germany:1
Chemidplus:0025322683
EPA/NOAA CAMEO:hazardous materials
 
References:
Canada Domestic Sub. List:25322-68-3
Pubchem (sid):134996364
 
Other Information:
(IUPAC):Atomic Weights of the Elements 2009
(IUPAC):Atomic Weights of the Elements 2009 (pdf)
Videos:The Periodic Table of Videos
tgsc:Atomic Weights use for this web site
(IUPAC):Periodic Table of the Elements
FDA Substances Added to Food (formerly EAFUS):View
FDA Indirect Additives used in Food Contact Substances:View
CHEBI:View
CHEMBL:View
Golm Metabolome Database:Search
KEGG (GenomeNet):C01092
HMDB (The Human Metabolome Database):HMDB37790
FooDB:FDB016934
FDA Listing of Food Additive Status:View
Haz-Map:View
Household Products:Search
MedlinePlusSupp:View
Wikipedia:View
RSC Learn Chemistry:View
 
Potential Blenders and core components note
None Found
 
Potential Uses:
 binding agents
 emulsion stabilisers
 humectants
 solvents
 viscosity controlling agents
 
Occurrence (nature, food, other):note
 not found in nature
 
Synonyms:
alpha-hydro-omega-hydroxypoly(oxy-1,2-ethanediyl)
 polyethylene glycol 1000 NF
 polyethylene glycol 200
 polyethylene glycol 300
 polyethylene glycol 400 USP/NF/FCC
 polyethylene glycol 600
 polyethylene glycol 8000 flakes NF
 polyethyleneglycol
 

Articles:

Info:EVALUATION OF CERTAIN FOOD ADDITIVES AND CONTAMINANTS
US Patents:3,953,378 - Mineral carrier for volatile substances and process for preparing same
PubMed:[Effect of Triton X-100 on genetic segregation and associated monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous traits in sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.)].
J-Stage:Effects of Polyethylene Glycol on Bovine Intestine Alkaline Phosphatase Activity and Stability
PubMed:Pharmaceutical optimization of lipid-based dosage forms for the improvement of taste-masking, chemical stability and solubilizing capacity of phenobarbital.
PubMed:Room temperature ionic liquids: new GC stationary phases with a novel selectivity for flavor and fragrance analyses.
PubMed:[Comparative study of the use of sennoside A and B vs polyethylene glycol and electrolytes in anterograde preparation of the colon].
PubMed:beta-D(+) glucose-glucose oxidase-catalase for use as an antioxidant system.
PubMed:Palatability of colonic lavage solution is improved by the addition of artificially sweetened flavored drink mixes.
 
Notes:
a tasteless laxative composed of peg3350; miralax is tradename. polymers of ethylene oxide and water and their ethers. they vary in consistency from liquid to solid, depending on the molecular weight, indicated by a number following the name. they are used as surfactants, dispersing agents, solvents, ointment and suppository bases, vehicles, and tablet excipients. some specific groups are lauromagrogols, nonoxynols, octoxynols and poloxamers. Diluent in colour additive mixts. for colouring shell eggs; coating, binder, plasticising agent and/or lubricant in tablets used for food; adjuvant to improve flavour and as a bodying agent in non-nutritive sweeteners; adjuvant in dispersing vitamin preparations; defoaming agent; boiler-water additive, etc. Depending on the catalyst type, the mechanism of polymerization can be cationic or anionic. The anionic mechanism is preferable because it allows one to obtain PEG with a low polydispersity. Polymerization of ethylene oxide is an exothermic process. Overheating or contaminating ethylene oxide with catalysts such as alkalis or metal oxides can lead to runaway polymerization which can end with an explosion after few hours.; PEG is a popular precipitant for protein crystallization, X-ray diffraction of protein crystals can reveal the atomic structure of proteins.; PEG is traditionally also one of the main ingredients in Paintball fill because it is thick and flexible. However, as early as 2006, some Paintball manufacturers have been substituting PEG with cheaper alternatives.; PEGylation is the act of covalently coupling a PEG structure to another larger molecule, for example, a therapeutic protein (which is then referred to as PEGylated). PEGylated interferon alfa-2a or -2b is a commonly used injectable treatment for Hepatitis C infection.; Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), also known as poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) or polyoxyethylene (POE), is the most commercially important type of polyether. PEG, PEO or POE refers to an oligomer or polymer of ethylene oxide. The three names are chemically synonymous, but historically PEG has tended to refer to oligomers and polymers with a molecular mass below 20,000 g/mol, PEO to polymers with a molecular mass above 20,000 g/mol, and POE to a polymer of any molecular mass. PEG and PEO are liquids or low-melting solids, depending on their molecular weights. PEGs are prepared by polymerization of ethylene oxide and are commercially available over a wide range of molecular weights from 300 g/mol to 10,000,000 g/mol. While PEG and PEO with different molecular weights find use in different applications and have different physical properties (e.g. viscosity) due to chain length effects, their chemical properties are nearly identical. Different forms of PEG are also available dependent on the initiator used for the polymerization process. The most common of which is a monofunctional methyl ether PEG (methoxypoly(ethylene glycol)), abbreviated mPEG. PEGs are also available with different geometries. Branched PEGs have 3 to 10 PEG chains emanating from a central core group. Star PEGs have 10 - 100 PEG chains emanating from a central core group. Comb PEGs have multiple PEG chains normally grafted to a polymer backbone.; Polyethylene glycol has a low toxicity and is used in a variety of products. It is the basis of a number of laxatives (e.g. macrogol-containing products such as Movicol and polyethylene glycol 3350, or SoftLax, MiraLax or GlycoLax). It is the basis of many skin creams, as cetomacrogol, and sexual lubricants, frequently combined with glycerin. Whole bowel irrigation (polyethylene glycol with added electrolytes) is used for bowel preparation before surgery or colonoscopy and drug overdoses. It is sold under the brand names GoLYTELY, NuLytely, GlycoLax, Fortrans, TriLyte, Colyte, Halflytely, MiraLAX, Softlax and MoviPrep. When attached to various protein medications, polyethylene glycol allows a slowed clearance of the carried protein from the blood. This makes for a longer acting medicinal effect and reduces toxicity, and it allows longer dosing intervals. Examples include PEG-interferon alpha, which is used to treat hepatitis C, and PEG-filgrastim (Neulasta), which is used to treat neutropenia. It has been shown that polyethylene glycol can improve healing of spinal injuries in dogs. One of the earlier findings that polyethylene glycol can aid in nerve repair came from the University of Texas (Krause and Bittner). Polyethylene glycol is commonly used to fuse B-cells with myeloma cells in monoclonal antibody production. PEG has recently been proved to give better results in constipation patients than tegaserod.; Since PEG is a flexible, water-soluble polymer, it can be used to create very high osmotic pressures (tens of atmospheres). It also is unlikely to have specific interactions with biological chemicals. These properties make PEG one of the most useful molecules for applying osmotic pressure in biochemistry experiments, particularly when using the osmotic stress technique.[citation needed]
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